Designer cat fights in the Twitter-sphere. Ah, such a common occurrence now that they make my eyes roll like I dropped the big one in Vegas.

Recently I came across the tried-and-tested, never gets old, Photoshop Vs Sketch argument in full flow recently and was witness to some of the most juvenile replies I’ve experienced in my many years in this game.

Now these replies that I just referred to were coming from a person that I’m sure many may look up to in the community. If it was 4 years ago they may have even been referred to as a ‘Rock-Star Designer’ but thankfully it’s 2017 so that title is as current as a blog post entitled ‘Why MacPaint is no longer the go-to design tool’.

There’s too many, shall we say time-served designers (and it has gotten worse in the past few years) whose over inflated egos have run rampant. “This is my point” they exclaim. “Agree with it or suffer my fury you lesser mortal”.

Now, at the risk of sounding like a broken record, when I started out back in the days of solely Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Flash and the like (ask your grandparents about some of those), the community as a whole seemed to be a lot more supportive, and egos were kept in check a little more. This unfortunately is not the case now.

You have to stop and ask yourself is this what other designers, especially inexperienced ones entering the game want to be reading. Alleged (and I use the terms loosely with a small-subset of them) professionals sniping with non-constructive, juvenile comments on Twitter? They can no longer pull pig-tails in the playground so this is the next best option I guess?

What does this teach designers starting on their learning journey? That once you rise to a certain status within the community that it’s all good to act like a complete dick?

Ok, there are younger designers out there who haven’t faced any form of criticism in their working lives, so yes, they need to understand it’s not all unicorns and rainbows out there, and be open to taking some helpful critiquing on the chin, but to shape this community for the better, the time served designers out there need to show a little more humility, maturity, and dish out criticism in the right kind of way.

Yes we’re all busy. Busy, busy bees we really are, and if you haven’t got the time to go out of your way and construct a 4000 word tutorial, or do a Q&A session on Designer News, then at the very least giving helpful critiques and/or comments on an article or Tweet is a small, but positive step in the right direction.

There’s not enough time-served designers acting their f***ing age, and giving something constructive back to the community, and that’s a real shame. Yes we’re all busy. Busy, busy bees we really are, and if you haven’t got the time to go out of your way and construct a 4000 word tutorial, or do a Q&A session on Designer News, then at the very least giving helpful critiques and/or comments on an article or Tweet is a small, but positive step in the right direction.

Designers young or old, just starting out, or looking to improve their skills at a later stage in their career, need insightful, constructive comments and criticism. They need to see more experienced designers showing a little more maturity and community spirit.

Now I don’t mean they have to go the way of dancing through poppy fields holding hands or singing Kum ba yah around a fireplace together, but just bring something a little constructive to the proceedings.

They have this fountain of knowledge inside of them, why be selfish and keep it all to themselves. You can’t take it with you, pay some of it forward (woop, woop, old-skool reference alert!), and produce better, stronger, more informed and tolerant designers in the future.

Thanks for reading the article,
Marc